Home » Zamora Texts: Democracies: Their Fall and Revival by Bohdan W. Wojciechowski
Zamora Texts: Democracies: Their Fall and Revival Bohdan W. Wojciechowski

Zamora Texts: Democracies: Their Fall and Revival

Bohdan W. Wojciechowski

Published January 13th 2013
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
214 pages
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 About the Book 

Social order is essential to human progress. But we humans are conflicted by two opposite needs: satisfying our individualism and the need to co-operate. This dichotomy challenged us for many millennia, as we became an organized species, whileMoreSocial order is essential to human progress. But we humans are conflicted by two opposite needs: satisfying our individualism and the need to co-operate. This dichotomy challenged us for many millennia, as we became an organized species, while seeking personal satisfaction. The road to the social structures of 9000 CE has led us from tribal organizations through multiethnic empires and early democracies, finally on to the advanced structures of our future described by the lecturer. It was not the self-seeking side of human nature that led us on such a convoluted early journey. It was our inadequate grasp of reality, our ideologies, and technology that was inadequate for a truly rational and humane system of government. In early times we tried top-down social structures. These became outmoded as education and knowledge spread throughout all social spheres. The result was the spread of democracies or regimes pretending to be democratic. By the second millennium, democracies of varying kinds were our preferred form of government. But they were premature- we are still not ready, technologically or ideologically, for a viable democracy. Our third millennium democracies have inherited various feudal trappings such as “sovereign immunity” which make it nearly impossible to hold elected and other high officeholders accountable for their misdeeds. Moreover, our current democratic leaders exaggerate the need for equality for all citizens- in voting, entitlements, and other social “rights.” They impose intolerable burdens on society while seeking to equalize the well-being of all individuals, regardless of merit. And so our present democracies will fail, in the dystopian period of the Regression. In our distant future, the lecturer assures us that we will have a form of democracy that provides us with utopian peace and stability, thanks to new technology and new approaches to governing. We will learn to obey the laws of nature and to be objective. Local governments will offer lifestyle choices and opportunities to nurture our individualisms. With the aid of computers we will develop policies that will steadily lead to progress towards our perceived eschatological goal.