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Brut y Tywysogion Cambrian Archaeological Association

Brut y Tywysogion

Cambrian Archaeological Association

Published May 12th 2012
ISBN : 9781151171580
Paperback
320 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1864 Excerpt: ... part having been apparently the resultMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1864 Excerpt: ... part having been apparently the result of oxydation, and not accident or violence, the weapon appearing to have undergone little or no usage. The usual projecting midrib also is rather an angular ridge caused by the sloping faces of the blade, which are perfectly plain, without any approximation to a curve, as in the sword given in the next figure. No. 9.--Sword. This weapon has unfortunately lost the lower part. In other respects it is in exceedingly good condition, the thin bevelled edges being but slightly injured, although it has evidently been used. It belongs to the class of leaf-shaped swords, although the swelling outlines characteristic of the class are not so strongly developed as in some cases. It has a thick central rib, which dies away very gradually into the blade, the surfaces on each side being hollowed out in a very slight curve. It fits into one of the scabbards, if allowed to be such, to about half its length. If these scabbards, however, were intended for swords of this shape, it is not easy to understand why they were not better adapted to the form of the blade. The existing portion of the sword is about thirteen inches, which was originally, judging from other specimens of the same type, about twenty inches. It is broken at the point where the blade usually lessens in breadth, and soon after increases to form the shoulders, beneath which would be the rivet holes for securing the casing of the handle. No. 10.--A scabbard or scabbard-tip. It has been stated, and is generally believed, that no instance of a complete scabbard of a bronze sword has yet been dis covered in the three islands. It is, however, difficult to conceive that an implement like that of No. 10, measuring nearly fourteen inches in length, and apparently complete in its...